Chris Miller has more money in the bank than all other candidates for governor combined

By Stephen Baldwin, RealWV

With more than $7 million in combined campaign contributions, the race to be West Virginia’s next governor is attracting national attention. Patrick Morrisey is raking in thousands of contributions, including controversial ones, from across the country while Moore Capito is pulling in money from the state’s power players. But businessman Chris Miller has more in the bank than all of the other candidates, combined.

Here’s a quick rundown of the major candidates’s fundraising efforts. 

Patrick Morrisey

Patrick Morrisey began with $1.5 million and raised an additional $590,000 this quarter. He spent $271,000, leaving him $1.8 million in his campaign account. 

He has a deep base of individual donors, as he submitted more than 700 pages of names of people who contributed to his campaign this quarter, though many of them appear multiple times for tiny donations in the amounts of $1 or $2.22, for example. 

Numerous political donors from across America gave Morrisey large contributions, including Atanasio Panousopoulos, CEO of a produce company called Delta Fresh, who donated $2,800. His father was indicted earlier this year for providing political bribes in Nogales, Arizona, a border town. 

Selman Akinci, a Turkish-American who lives in California and runs a travel reimbursement company called Click 2 Refund, gave Morrisey $2,000. 

Bob Castellini, who is the CEO and majority owner of the Cincinnati Reds, gave Morrisey $2,800. 

Bill Doddridge, who runs a diamond import company in California, also gave Morrisey $2,800. He also runs a pro-Trump political action committee. 

Krista Frost, who lists her employment as “homemaker” and was a Georgia delegate to the 2020 Republican National Convention, also gave Morrisey $2,800.

Scott Watson owns a marina in Palm City, FL, and also gave Morrisey $2,800. 

While he did not disclose the overall percentage of out of state donors, it appears that approximately 75% of his donors are outside West Virginia. 

Moore Capito

Moore Capito began with $1.1 million and raised an additional $270,000 this quarter. He spent $171,000, leaving him $1.2 million in his campaign account. 

Donors continue to include political action committees tied to federal officials, business leaders, real estate investors, attorneys, car dealers, energy executives, and power brokers from across the state and nation. Ross Perot also donated $5,600 to Capito, $2,800 in the primary and $2,800 in the general. 

Capito held fundraisers in numerous states including Texas, North Carolina, and Washington, DC, earlier in the year, but stuck to fundraising in West Virginia this quarter. 

Approximately two-thirds of his donations come from inside the state. 

Chris Miller

Chris Miller began with $3.6 million and raised an additional $122,000 this quarter. He spent $165,000, leaving him $3.7 million in his campaign account. 

Miller continues to be his own campaign’s largest donor, loaning himself $3 million thus far. His other contributors include numerous auto dealers and Nick Preservati, an employee of the WV Department of Economic Development, who donated $2,800. 

Like Morrisey, Miller did not disclose the origin of some donations directly but it appears more than half his donations were from inside the state. All of his fundraisers were held inside the state. 

Mac Warner

Mac Warner began with $210,000 and raised an additional $52,000 this quarter. He spent $98,000, leaving him $164,000 in his campaign account. 

He held a fundraiser in Arizona where he received no funds and spent $1,328.  More than half his donations come from out of state. 

Steve Williams

The only Democratic candidate to declare for office is Mayor Steve Williams. He raised $4,265 this quarter. He spent $937.09 and has $3,300 in the bank. 

All of his donations came from inside the state. 

For our previous reporting on gubernatorial campaign finance reports, click here.

Stay tuned to The Real WV for continuing coverage of campaign finance reports as we follow the money in state political races.

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